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CTA provides feedback on environmental initiatives

Curtesy of Cantruck.ca

The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) has some ideas on how the federal government can reduce greenhouse gases from transportation.

The CTA president Stephen Laskowski presented to the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, offering input on regulatory change.

The organization is supportive of reducing the sector’s carbon footprint. However, the targets set for future regulations must be based on proven technologies and the carbon pricing system needs to be structured properly to support future green transportation.

Laskowski said the industry is hopeful about phase 2 of regulations because it will not introduce equipment with the same challenges that previous regulations forced into the industry.

The technology must be built to Canadian standards, he said.

While the alliance is not opposed to carbon pricing, a system should be properly structured and easy to administer, and the industry must be mindful of staying competitive in the market since U.S. trucking companies will not face similar carbon pricing pressures.

Source: Trucknews.com

President Trump promises “first-class” roads thanks to new public funding

On June 7, President Donald Trump announced the government would create a “first-class” system of roads, bridges and waterways by using $200 billion in public funds to generate $1 trillion in investment to pay for construction projects that public officials agree are overdue.

Trump said America must have the best, fastest and most reliable infrastructure in the world. During his campaign across the country last year, he was asked why the U.S. was spending money to rebuild other countries, and he proclaimed that it was time to rebuild this country.

Democrats have balked at Trump’s plan for financing improvements, arguing it would result in taxpayer-funded profits for corporations.

President Donald Trump said in Cincinnati that as he campaigned across the country last year, people often asked him why the U.S. was spending money to rebuild other countries when the roads and bridges they travel on needed rebuilding, too.. (Associated Press: JOHN MINCHILLO)

The White House, however, has not outlined specifics of the infrastructure plan.

The proposed funding with $200 billion in public funds over 9 years would average $1 trillion worth of construction to include improving routes for transporting agricultural products.

Mike Toohey, president of the Waterways Council Inc., said he was happy the president is addressing rivers since more attention is paid to roadways, railways and runways.

However, he said the proposal could result in higher costs for commercial users that finance the waterways’ upkeep in the first place.

Source: therucker.com

 

Supreme court denies lawsuit challenging the use of ELDs

Curtesy of overdriveonline.com

In favour of the U.S. Department of Transportation, the U.S. Supreme Court decided it would not hear a lawsuit that challenges a ruling that requires truck operators to use an electronic logging device to track hours of service.

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association was behind the lawsuit and a member of legal counsel said the organization was disappointed that the Supreme Court did not review the case.

The association will continue to press the issue in Congress and with the Trump Administration.

The American Trucking Association is in agreement with the Supreme Court’s decision, saying it supports the FMCSA as it works toward the December deadline for electronic logging devices.

The OOIDA sought to have the mandate struck down in court, indicating ELDs violate a drivers constitutional rights and protections against warrantless searches and seizures, and that the rule did not meet the stipulations set for an ELD mandate.

The lawsuit was brought against the DOT in March 2016, and a three-judge panel on the Chicago-based 7th Circuit Court of Appeals heard the case last September. The following month, it ruled in favour of the DOT, and dismissed the arguments of the case.

In April of this year, the OOIDA filed a writ of certiorari asking the Supreme Court to take up the case. There will be no appeal, as the OOIDA decided not to challenge the court’s decision.

Source: overdriveonline.com

North American truck orders topped 20,000 for fifth month in a row

Image curtesy of ccjdigital.com

Preliminary data compiled by ACT Research and FTR, class 8 North American truck orders topped the 20,000 unit mark for the fifth month in April.

Posting 23,900 truck orders last month, ACT President Kenny Vieth says early spring is the typical time of year when orders moderate, but he expects another month of solid orders before summer seasonal slack settles in.

April orders met expectations with a 4 per cent increase over March.

Fleets are expecting better freight conditions in the second half of the year, and current truck order activity reflects that.

The market continues to show solid movement, Ake said, and this is a typical moderate market recovery.

Truck sales were weak in Q1, but so was the economy.

Class 8 orders for the past six months now annualize to 262,000 units. Backlogs should increase in April, reaching levels nearly a year ago.
Source : ccjdigital.com article by Jason Cannon

Healthy start for Natural gas sales, but uncertain forecast for the future

The first quarter of 2017 saw a health start for North American natural gas sales, boosted from fleets, transit and school bus operators.

This is the best January in the past three years, which set up a positive year-to-date February, said Steve Tam, vice-president of ACT Research.

Image Curtesy of ontruck.org

“Among truckers, it appears as through the majority of incremental volume came from those who currently have natural gas vehicles and are replacing units or increasing their number.”

According to ACT’s most recent natural Gas & Alternative Fuels Quarterly publication, natural gas Class 8 trucks and bus sales remain low.

Meanwhile, the Ontario Trucking Association continues to work with the Government of Ontario in the design of a heavy truck natural gas problem; this aims to reduce barriers and spur natural gas technology in the marketplace.

Last year, the province committed to paying $250 million to the commercial trucking industry for technology to reduce carbon emissions.

Source: ontruck.org

Mexico recognizes the benefit of NAFTA

Mexico’s trucking industry is now Canada’s third-largest trading partner thanks to the benefits of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Rogelio F. Montemayor Morineau
Image curtesy of todaystrucking.com

“It has been good to us. It has been good to our economy,” says Rogelio F. Montemayor Morineau, president of the 5,000-member Canacar – Mexico’s national trucking association.

The partnership has benefitted Canada as well. Trade between Mexico and Canada has increased roughly 11% per year.

Mexico is now Canada’s second-largest supplier of auto parts. Exports of goods-moving vehicles has grown about 45.3% per year. Mexico is now the sixth-largest producer of heavy vehicles in the world.

However, Mexico is still faced with other issues. It takes up to 14 hours to drive from the border of Nuevo Laredo to Mexico City, and secure rest areas are few and far between. This makes it difficult to comply with driving time.

Furthermore, there are recruiting challenges to face. Mexico is having trouble finding quality and professional drivers to handle the growing workload.

The new U.S. administration may change screening requirements that will affect freight flows overall.

“They say they want to change NAFTA, but they don’t say what they want to change,” Montemayor Morineau said. “What is really going to happen in the future? I really don’t know about NAFTA.

In the meantime, Mexico remains a manufacturing hub for recognizable brands in the world.

Source: todaystrucking.com

How to combat rust and corrosion on your trucks

Image curtesy of Trucknews.com

Every company has a budget for truck maintenance. This includes the replacement cost for brake parts, wheels, electronic-related items, and more. What’s often not included in the budget is rust prevention.

Corrosion, however, is a very costly problem to fix. In fact, it is a $2.2-trillion industrial problem.

“The approximate cost of corrosion to U.S society that year [2011] was $460 billion,” said Zane McCarthy, a mechanical engineer and corrosion expert.

McCarthy estimates the cost of corrosion from buildings, roads, and industrial equipment. While corrosion has always been a concern, it has become increasingly problematic over the last seven to eight years. Since the introduction of corrosive road de-icing chemicals that are mixed with binding agents, these chemicals keep material from flowing off the road, but causes corrosion and rust on vehicles.

Penske Truck Leasing has switched to air disc brakes from wide-block S-cam brakes to help control the rust problem.

“We decided to try air disc brakes on a few trucks operating up in the northeast, where those chemicals are used, and we saw a reduction in downtime and repair costs in the first year, said Paul Rosa, the president of Penske Truck Leasing.

Magnesium chloride is another problematic chemical, as it’s more conductive than sodium. It is attracted to electricity and copper, therefore spreads faster.

Instead of throwing money at the problem to try and fix it, there are cost-effective solutions to consider.

McCarthy suggests replacing parts if they study their own corrosion issues, develop a plan to tackle them, or better understand what parts are failing and why.

Source: Todaystrucking.com

Fuel-efficient technology being showcased in U.S. road show

Shell, PepsiCO, the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE) and Carbon War Room are working together to showcase more fuel-efficient technologies in a U.S. road show.

The show, Run on Less, will be a three-week tour in September and feature six to 10 Class 8 trucks equipped with technology that will help achieve at least 26 litres per 100 kilometers (9 miles per US gallon).

The last stop on the tour will be on September 24 at the new North American Commercial Vehicle show in Atlanta, Georgia.

Image curtesy of : Nacfe.org

The Run on Less website will track driver progress and saved dollars and carbon emissions.

Fleets that want to participate will be accepting applications.

The NACFE board chairman recently stated fleets need help sifting through the noise and making better purchasing decisions, while manufacturers need to understand the benefits of how fleets use technologies.

Shell is a proponent of this and works to raise awareness of energy challenges, and the tour is a great way to demonstrate their commitment.

Run on Less is a unique opportunity to demonstrate best practices and improve the bottom line for North American fleets.

Source: todaystrucking.com

Women in Trucking Association Celebrates 10 Years of Diversity


The Women In Trucking Association (WIT) is celebrating its 10-year anniversary.

The nonprofit organization has worked over the last 10 years to encourage women to consider careers in the trucking industry, while addressing any issues that may have prevented a woman from succeeding in the job.

The organization has over 4,500+ members of carriers, suppliers, industry professionals, drivers and students. Sixteen per cent of WIT members are men in support of the program and its goals.

Women continue to be a minority in the transportation industry, but WIT has made strides in raising awareness and increasing the ranks of women.

Source: womenintrucking.org

ELD mandate will push truckload rates higher in 2017

Curtesy of : fleetowner.com

Truckload rates are set to increase an average of 4 per cent this year as a result of an ELD mandate that is about compensating for economic recovery.

The economy has shifted from a high-growth economy to slower-growth but more consumer oriented with a growth at 2%. The industry is concerned for what will happen in 2018 and 2019, and the chance of a recession.

The ELD mandate could also cause a drop in volume and in pricing from 5 to 10 per cent. The impact of ELDs on late adopters is likely high, and it could take a few years before industry professionals realize they’ll have to do it.

Another mandate at play is President Trump’s proposed trillion-dollar transportation infrastructure program, but it hasn’t been decided who will be paying for it. It could come out of higher toll rates.

The FTR estimates that trucking pays 3 cents per mile to maintain an efficient highway system. Maintenance backlogs could double that to 6 cents per mile, and improving the system with additional lanes and highways will bring that cost to 20 cents per mile.

The industry forecast of 25% growth in the 2020s is exaggerated. With the national debt and transportation demand, it could grow by as little as 5%.

Source: fleetowner.com