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Month: July 2017

Feds uncover $2.1B in transportation spending

Image courtesy of cbc.ca – Transport Minister speaks at a luncheon in Ottawa, Tuesday July 4, 2017. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Canada’s Minister of Transport reported $2.1 billion for the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative (TTCI) to manufacture more grounded, more proficient transportation passages to international markets today.

The TTCI investments will bolster the production of steady employments, by transporting goods more productively Canadian organizations will have the capacity to better contend, develop and make more occupations well into the future, the minister affirmed.

The core element of the TTCI is the merit-based National Trade Corridors Fund (NTCF), which will provide $2 billion over 11 years to strengthen Canada’s trade infrastructure, including ports, waterways, airports, roads, bridges, border crossings, rail networks and the interconnectivity between them. With the launch of this fund, proponents are being invited to submit an expression of interest for funding to support projects that address urgent capacity constraints and keep goods moving efficiently along Canada’s trade corridors.

TTCI is the legitimacy based National Trade Corridors Fund (NTCF), which will provide $2 billion over 11 years to strengthen Canada’s trade infrastructure, including ports, waterways, airports, roads, bridges, border crossings, rail networks and the interconnectivity between them. With the unveiling of this fund, proponents are being invited to submit an expression of interest for funding to support projects that address urgent capacity constraints and keep goods moving proficiently along Canada’s trade corridors.

 “Investments through the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative will make a big difference for Canadian businesses,” Garneau said. “It will allow them to get better access to international markets by addressing critical bottlenecks and ensuring that Canada’s transportation networks remain cost competitive and efficient. This also means more jobs that support middle-class families everywhere across the country.”

Up to $400 million of the NTCF will be dedicated to supporting the critical movement of people and goods in Canada’s Northern territories, given that region’s unique and urgent needs.

Source: Trucknews.com

Learn the A, B, and Cs of Transport Truck Trailers

Ever ponder what the distinction between A Trains and B Trains were? Did you even think about the presence of C Trains? This article clarifies the distinctive ways that two trailers are hooked to each other in North America. When you allude to an arrangement of trailers as A, B or C trains you are truly referring to the connection between the two.

A – Train Semi Truck Trailers

A train is connected by a dolly that is hooked up to a pintle hook on the rear of the forward trailer. The dolly has one or two axles, and it is licensed as a separate trailer.

  • Single axle A Trains are utilized to keep running between terminals
  • Double axle A trains are utilized for Long Combination Vehicles, to put two 48’ or 53’ trailers together. A-Trains are used for pulling Van (enclosed) trailers.

B-Train Semi Truck Trailers

B-Trains are a truck-trailer combination where the axles of the lead trailer stick out and a fifth wheel is mounted on the lead trailer. The axles of the lead trailer slide underneath the lead trailer so it can back into a door just like a regular trailer.

The operation of these trucks usually don’t require going back to a dock, drivers simply drive forward, making it less trying. The drivers that do drive these trucks, however, have a tendency to be experienced and can back into docks or around corners in spite of the size of their trucks.

  • The 8 axle, 63,500 kg B Train is standard across Canada.
  • A set of two can be pulled to a destination.
  • Popular for hauling flatbed, bulk and liquid goods in Canada and some US states.

C-Train Semi Truck Trailers

The lead trailer pulls a dolly that the second trailer sits on. There are two pintle hooks, which removes one of the points of articulation from the unit. This makes the second trailer significantly steadier. This does make it harder to hook the dolly to the lead trailer.

  • Rarest of the double trailer combinations
  • C-Trains pull long combination vehicles, not shorter double trailers in Western Canada
  • The tires on this dolly will wear significantly speedier from going around corners

 

Source: bigtruckguide.com

Class 8 truck orders revived in June

The industry forecaster is demonstrating that June’s a remarkable comeback from May is in accordance with anticipations. The market is performing at a persistent pace, FTR reports. With orders totaling 216,000 units sold over 12 months.

Preliminary Class 8 truck orders came in at 17,600 units in June, indicating a 7% increase compared to May and 38% spike according to FTR.

“The June orders confirm that the market just took a brief respite in May after several stronger than expected months,” said Don Ake, VP of commercial vehicles at FTR. “The orders are right where we expect them to be and on track with our forecast.  The fact that orders are up 38% over last year proves the market is much improved this year.”

Don added: “Fleets are ordering to fill out their remaining requirements for the second half of the year.  However, it is still good news that orders rose and did not drop significantly from May. This shows the market is steady, stable and primed for a strong year in 2018.”

Courtesy of : Trucknews.com

ACT Research details:

  • Classes 5-8 net orders were 37% higher equally 43,000 units.
  • Classes 5-7 orders were up 28% in the second quarter
  • Orders of 18,100 Class 8 trucks in June
  • Down 6.5% compared to the first quarter of this year

“While orders are weak relative to year-to-date activity, June’s orders were up 39% compared to last year,” said Kenny Vieth, president and senior analyst at ACT Research. “Because of a deep seasonal trend that runs through Class 8 orders, seasonal adjustment provides a significant boost to June’s orders. When adjusted, the June volume rises to 20,200 units.”

Preliminary Classes 5-7 orders slipped from May by 1,500 units, to 20,200, according to ACT Research.

Source: Trucknews.com